Understanding Your Why

When I was younger my big dream was to own a home of my own.  I never had any money left over to put towards saving for a home. I wasn’t a high income earner and I already worked more than one job, so I couldn’t take on extra work. I knew the only way I was going to make enough money and have more freedom was to go into business for myself, but I didn’t know the first thing about business, or know anyone in business to ask, but what I had was a good brain and a compelling reason. More than anything in this world I wanted to give my children a great life and to be available for school functions and holidays. Having a compelling reason to create my dream gave me the motivation to look for different ways to attain my goals, and to persist when things didn’t go the way I planned.

In the early 1900s Samuel Pierpont Langley set out to be the first man to fly an airplane. He was highly educated and ambitious and had friends in high places who funded his efforts, so he was able to use only the best materials. He also had a dream team of talent to help him achieve his goal.

Wilbur and Orville Wright’s passion for aeronautics and flying started when their father brought home a model helicopter made of cork, bamboo and paper that was powered by a rubber band. When they started working on their own flying machine they didn’t have any money or funding, and they didn’t have any college degrees. They had people helping them but no-one on their team had any advanced training. Yet, despite the odds against them the Wright Brothers beat Samuel Pierpont Langley to become the first people to fly an airplane. Why?

Langley had a goal, the Wright Brothers had a dream. Goals can be great, but they don’t motivate us as much as a dreams do. Dreams come from our heart and soul, they inspire us to be more, do more. Understanding your why is one of the most important discoveries you can make.

Why do You Want it?

The most important question you can ask yourself is, “Why do I want it?”

I ask this question in coaching often and one of the answers I often hear is, “I want to make a difference”.

But why do you want to make a difference?

We rarely get the real answer with just one question. If you asked that question followed by, “And what else?”, and you wrote your answers down each time you would get closer to what your deepest motivation is.

If you want a goal because your mind worked out that this is the best way for you to achieve your dreams, then it won’t motivate you enough. Most people give up easily when they don’t see results but people with a compelling ‘why’ often persist even when the odds are against them.

As my children grew and became independent, I needed a new ‘why’. If you had asked me all those years ago why I pushed myself to overcome my fear of public speaking and putting myself out there with my opinion, I most likely would have said, “I want to help people”. And that would be true, because it’s what I’ve always wanted, but I could have volunteered, or performed acts of kindness without pushing myself through my fears. My real motivation was that I wanted to be heard and I love to share. I didn’t feel heard growing up, I felt my opinions were always rubbished and that may have just been the way I perceived things back then, but it was a powerful motivator for me.

Curiosity is one of my gifts. Learning, researching, exploring, understanding and then sharing is what makes me feel alive. It keeps me young. My why nowadays is still learning and sharing and that’s because this make me happier than anything else I do, it’s that simple.

Imagine someone asking you why they should do business with you, why they should support you, or why they should employ you. When you know your why, you inspire confidence. People trust you. When we have a compelling why, we wake up each day eager to start again. We find the time. We overcome our fears.

When you know your why, create a daily routine that supports you, and take steps at least five days a week to turn your dream into reality, you can forget how it will manifest. The how is less important than the why, as it often takes care of itself.

 

 

Posted by / July 2, 2019 / 0 Comments
Posted in
goal achievement, Uncategorized
Anne Hartley

Anne Hartley

Anne Hartley is the founder and CEO of Hart Life Coaching Anne is also the author of several books including Financially Free, Love the Life You Live, Love Your Money - Love Your Life and Life Lessons. www.hartlifecoaching.com.au

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